Class Archive

LLL Spring Classes April 2018
Tuesdays 3, 10, 17, 24
Wednesdays 4, 11, 18, 25

9:00 AM (TUE)
The Crusades
April 3, 10, 17, 24
Florian Burdick
The Medieval Man – Europe, Latin West, Byzantine East and Syria. Week 2: The Church and its Power – Urban, Spain, “Holy War.” Week 3: The Crusades Numbers One, Two and Three – off to war and adventure; and the little crusades in between. Week 4: Postmodern history – for some the crusades have never ended. Florian graduated from Geneva College, Beaver Falls, PA in 1971 with a BA in English Literature with minors in German, history and speech; and from the Un. Of Missouri School of Journalism. He has experience in newspaper reporting and writing; and experience in industrial technical writing.

11:00 AM (TUE)
Mysteries at the Museum
April 3, 10, 17, 24
Ray Lennard
The museums of Lenawee County are filled with what appear to be random items that actually tell deep stories about the past. Learn how a small section of fence tells us the effects of war, how a table can unite farmers, how a coat can tell a tale of adventure in France, and how a booklet changed the life of one woman & forged a Lenawee institution. Mr. Lennard is the curator of the W. G. Thompson Museum. He also serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable.

1:00 PM (TUE)
The Reformation
April 3, 10, 17, 24
Marilyn Kremer
This class will show how one stubborn monk opposed the Pope and launched a religious revolution. Exploring Martin Luther in recognition of the 500th anniversary of his posting his 95 Theses and how his religious fervor changed the world. Marilyn Kremer is a veteran LLL presenter. With an eclectic interest in a variety of things, she has explored a variety of topics in prior classes including baseball, our wild-west myths and legends, theater, radio and TV history, and how our language developed.

3:00 PM (TUE)
How Advances in Science and Mathematics Moved Civilization Forward: Part II
April 3, 10, 17, 24
Robert Xeras
These lectures come from a History Course that I co-taught with history professors at Siena Heights. It was/is based on the book, “The Ascent Of Man” by Jacob Bronowski and Part II covers Chapters 5-8. YOU DO NOT NEED PART I TO TAKE PART II​. As a math science person, this course was a radical change in content and expanded my view of the world. Bronowski’s keen insights make this series interesting and thought provoking. Learn the way we write our numbers make all other mathematics possible. Do we write out number Left to Right or Right to Left? Learn how Galileo Galilei opens the door to the scientific method. And what is time? A clock? Learn how we moved from animal power to Nature’s Power. Each lecture will begin with an introduction, showing of the video, and class discussion. Professor Robert Xeras has a BS in physics and an MS in mathematics. He taught mathematics and computers at several colleges. He started the computer and information systems program at Siena Heights University. Prior to that he was a senior systems analyst at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor. For 25 years he did statistical analysis as a consultant for the hospital.

9:00 AM (WED)
Contemporary Islam
April 4, 11, 18, 25
Dr. Michael McGrath
This class will concentrate on how mainstream Muslims practice Islam and express their beliefs. The class will also include critiques of radical political Islamism. Furthermore, the major split within Islam — the Sunni majority and the Shi’a minority will be covered. Dr. McGrath is well known to our students. He earned his Ph.D. from Princeton Un. He has experience as an Adrian College professor and former instructor for LLL on World Religions. His other experiences include military service and as an instructor of History.

11:00 AM (WED)
History of American Theater
April 4, 11, 18, 25
Erik Gable
This course will cover the story of American theater, beginning with the colonial era (when theaters and actors often had to hide behind euphemisms to avoid Puritan disapproval) and continuing through the era of minstrelsy, the so-called “Golden Age of the Opera House,” and the dawn of cinema. Erik Gable is the director of marketing and audience development at the Croswell Opera House, and wrote the book Behind the Curtain: 150 Years at Michigan’s Oldest Theater to mark the theater’s 150th anniversary in 2016

1:00 PM (WED)
Concerns in our Changing World
April 4, 11, 18, 25
Dr. Howard Pennington, Coordinator
April 4 – Personal Safety. Michelle Stuck, retired Michigan State Police Sgt. Inappropriate touching, elder abuse, road rage, awareness and more.
April 11 – Basic Genetics, Dr. Howard Pennington, How does the DNA work and how it may cause birth defects. Mary Poore, will talk about how her family adjusted to the birth of her son born with disabilities.
April 18 – Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Travis Haven, Executive Director of Hospice of Lenawee, will discuss Alzheimer’s and Dementia.
April 25 – How are G.M.O. foods made and how they are used. Marissa Schuh, SE Michigan Vegetable Educator.

3:00 PM (Wed.)
Local History Series
April 4, 11, 18, 25 Dr.
Howard Pennington, Coordinator
April 4 – History of Devils Lake area. Dan Cherry, a historian and author.
April 11 – History of Morenci. Jim Whitehouse, a historian and author.
April 18 – History of Tecumseh. Ashley Chase, a historian and author.
April 25 – History of Hudson. Mike Mills, a Hudson historian.

1:00 PM (Wed.)
Poetry Appreciation (Room 2)
April 4, 11, 18, 25
Charmaine Stangl
This time we will explore “A Dozen Masterpieces”. If you’re new to the world of poetry have no fear. It will be a joyful journey. Charmaine Stangl is a retired English teacher and life-long lover of poetry. She has taught in two high schools, a community college, two universities, and most recently, for Lenawee Lifelong Learning.

3:00 PM (Wed.)
Shakespeare’s MacBeth (Room 2)
April 4, 11, 18, 25
Dr. Robert Ploegstra
An overview and discussion of Shakespeare’s pseudo-historical Scottish play MacBeth. Robert Ploegstra, PhD, born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is an expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage.

Off Site Class
9:00 AM (Thur.) April 26th
Mystery/History Bus Trip in Lenawee County
The second Mystery/History Trip for LLL will be a one day bus trip to two surprise locations in Lenawee County. The group will board the Adrian Maples Blue Football Bus at 9:00 am at the LISD Tech Center. At 9:30 am the bus will arrive at the first location where there will be a guide to take the group on a tour. There will be walking as well as stair climbing. At 11 am the group will arrive at another mystery location. Around noon a lunch will be served from a predetermined menu. Around 1:30 pm there will be a presentation on this location. Followed by a self-guided exploration of the location. Approximately 2:30 pm the group will board the bus to return to the LISD Tech Center at approximately 3:00 pm. Participants will learn about a piece of Lenawee County history and interesting information on the county topography on this tour. Cost is $40 per person (must have LLL Membership). Minimum of 20 participants to have the trip with a maximum of 40 participants. (see back for additional details)

 

 

LLL Fall Classes October 2017
Tuesdays 3, 10, 17, 24
Wednesdays 4, 11, 18, 25

College Quality Classes For Seniors in Lenawee County
Please fill out Registration Forms and mail with check ($25 for the first course, $10 for the second course, any additional courses FREE) to PO Box 308, Adrian, 49221
All courses held at Weber Center, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, MI: (Except- Mystery Bus Trip). The 1st class costs $25, the 2nd class costs $10. All additional classes are FREE!

World War I and the Middle East 
October 3, 10, 17, 24
Florian Burdick
Tuesday, 9 am

Week 1 – An overview of WWI and British involvement in Arabia, a short review of the Ottoman Empire and the rise of The Young Turks who supported Germany during the war. Week 2 – A review of the McMahon-Hussein Correspondence, the Balfour Declaration, the Mandate Palestine passed by the League of Nations and the British campaign under Allenby to capture Jerusalem and Aqubah with the aid of T.E. Lawrence. Week 3 – How the Sunni and Sh’ia branches of Islam responded to the Treaty of Sevres, signed Aug. 10, 1920, between the Entente Powers and Turkey (Sultanate) which ended the Ottoman Empire. Week 4 – A review of Zionism and the creation of the nation of Israel; the Arab response beginning in 1920 with the Jewish war of independence. Florian was graduated from Geneva College, Beaver Falls, PA in 1971 with a BA in English Literature with minors in German, history and speech; and from the Un. Of Missouri School of Journalism. He has experience in newspaper reporting and writing; and experience in industrial technical writing.

 

Civil War Battles 
October 3, 10, 17, 24
Ray Lennard
Tuesday, 11 am

Most folks know about the battle of Gettysburg, the bloodshed at Antietam, or the carnage at Shiloh. In this class, we will examine lesser known battles that had long lasting impacts on the armies of the North and South. From the hills of Kentucky near Perryville, to the North Anna River, on the high seas aboard “Hull Number 290”, and on open fields just south of Nashville participants will not only learn about key “lesser” battles of the American Civil War and how they affected overall war strategy, but close examination will take place focusing on HOW participants in the battles fought and recalled the melee. Mr. Lennard is the curator of the W. G. Thompson Museum. He also serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable.

 

Civil War Battles 
October 3, 10, 17, 24
Ray Lennard
Tuesday, 11 am

Most folks know about the battle of Gettysburg, the bloodshed at Antietam, or the carnage at Shiloh. In this class, we will examine lesser known battles that had long lasting impacts on the armies of the North and South. From the hills of Kentucky near Perryville, to the North Anna River, on the high seas aboard “Hull Number 290”, and on open fields just south of Nashville participants will not only learn about key “lesser” battles of the American Civil War and how they affected overall war strategy, but close examination will take place focusing on HOW participants in the battles fought and recalled the melee. Mr. Lennard is the curator of the W. G. Thompson Museum. He also serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable.

 

Foundations of Naturopathic Health 
October 3, 10, 17, 24
Tuesday, 1 pm

This will be a four class ‘foundations of health’ series from an integrative medicine standpoint, including discussions around digestive, cardiovascular, brain, and environmental health. Analyzation of the impact of our Western lifestyle on our physiology and end with practical tips for improving your own health and quality of life. Dr. Vickie Modica earned a Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine at Bastyr University in Seattle, WA and a BS in Cellular and Molecular biology at the University of Michigan. She has worked in primary care in the Seattle area managing chronic illnesses including digestive disorders, diabetes, cholesterol, heart disease, and supporting cancer patients primarily with naturopathic tools. She now has a Naturopathic practice consulting with patients nationally and tends toward the use of education, lab testing, nutrition, specialized diets, hydrotherapy, herbs, and supplements as primary clinical tools.

 

Poetry Appreciation (Room 2) 
October 3, 10, 17, 24

Charmaine Stangl This time around we will be using a book, Ten Poems to Change Your Life by Roger Housden. We will explore both the poems and Roger Housden’s brilliant commentary. If you don’t have the book feel free to sit in and get as involved as you wish the first day. If you have the book, please be prepared to discuss the first poem and commentary. Charmaine Stangl is a retired English teacher and life-long lover of poetry. She has taught in two high schools, a community college, two universities, and most recently, for Lenawee Lifelong Learning.

 


Shakespeare’s Othello (Room 2) 
October 3, 10, 17, 24
Dr. Robert Ploegstra
Tuesday, 3 pm

An historical and literary discussion of Shakespeare’s Othello. Robert Ploegstra, PhD, born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is an expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage.


Local Historical Cemetery Tours 
October 3, 10, 17, 24
Tuesday, 3pm

A walk through our historic local cemeteries led by local historians to point out interesting markers and tell the related stories: Hudson, October 3rd; Tecumseh’s Brookside; October 10th, Blissfield, October 17th; and Adrian’s Oakwood on October 24th. This class will start at the respective cemetery and NOT at the Weber Center. Please allow an appropriate amount of time to be at the site at 3 PM.


How Food & Drink Affect our Culture 
October 4, 11, 18, 25
Marilyn Kremer
Wednesday, 11 am

We are what we eat (and drink)! An historical exploration of the roles both food and beverage have had in shaping our society, our culture and world events Marilyn Kremer is a veteran LLL instructor who enjoys exploring “how things happened”. Broadcast history was one of the several areas she covered with her students over the years. She taught in the public schools.

 


How Advances in Science and Mathematics Moved Civilization Forward 
October 4, 11, 18, 25
Robert Xeras
Wednesday, 1 pm

These lectures come from a History Course I co-taught with history professors at Siena Heights. It was based on the book, “The Ascent Of Man” by Jacob Bronowski. As a math science person, this course was a radical change in content, plus being exciting, enlightening, and expanding my view of the world. Bronowski’s keen insights make this series interesting and thought provoking as illustrated in the opening scene: “Man has gifts which make him unique among the animals, so unlike them he is not a mere figure on the landscape – he is a shaper of the landscape.” Profound! Discover that there are two nomadic tribes that still exist today. Discover that arithmetic is possible only because of the symbols used for our numbers. Discover the people in science who were persecuted for their theories. The lectures will begin with an introduction, showing of the video, and class discussion. Professor Robert Xeras has a BS in Physics and a MS in Mathematics. He has taught mathematics and computers at several colleges. He started the Computer Information Program at Siena Heights University. Prior to that he was a Senior Systems Analyst at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor. For 25 years he did Statistical Analysis as a consultant for the hospital.

 


Local History Series 
October 4, 11, 18, 25
Dr. Howard Pennington, Coordinator
Wednesday, 3 pm

Oct. 4 – History of Rollin Township and Addison. Alice Goodlock, a resident of Rollin Twp. for over 50 years will relate history and stories of that area. Oct. 11 – History of Clinton. Sharron Scott is the archivist of the Clinton Historical Society for forty years will tell the history and tales of Clinton. Oct. 18 – History of Blissfield. Bob Barringer is the Director of the Schultz-Holmes Memorial Library and will present history and tales of Blissfield. Oct. 25 – History of Sand Creek. Laurie Dickens Perkins grew up in Sand Creek and will tell history and stories of the area. She is the Southern Lower Michigan Historian at the Michigan Historical Center/Museum in Lansing.

 


Mystery Bus Trip in Lenawee County 
Thursday, October 26, 9 am

The second Mystery Trip for LLL will be a one day bus trip to two surprise locations in Lenawee County. The group will board the Adrian Maples Blue Football Bus at 9:00 am at the LISD Tech Center. At 9:30 am the bus will arrive at the first location where there will be a guide to take the group on a tour. There will be walking as well as stair climbing. At 11 am the group will arrive at another mystery location. Around noon a lunch will be served from a predetermined menu. Around 1:30 pm there will be a presentation on this location. Followed by a self-guided exploration of the location. Approximately 2:30 pm the group will board the bus to return to the LISD Tech Center at approximately 3:00 pm. Cost is $40 per person (must have LLL Membership). Minimum of 20 participants to have the trip with a maximum of 40 participants.

 

ARCHIVE
LLL Spring Classes April 2017

Tuesdays 4, 11, 18, 25
Wednesdays 5, 12, 19, 26

College Quality Classes For Seniors in Lenawee County
Please fill out Registration Forms and mail with check ($25 for the first course, $10 for the second course, any additional courses FREE) to PO Box 308, Adrian, 49221
All courses held at Weber Center, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, MI: (Except- Mystery Bus Trip and Wine Tasting. The 1st class costs $25, the 2nd class costs $10. All additional classes are FREE!

Media Series 
1 PM Tuesdays, April 4, 11, 18, 25

This class will consist of four different speakers from four different media types.

  • April 4th will feature Bruce Goldsen who will talk about his experiences owning and operating radio stations.
  • April 11th will feature Mark Lenz, the editor of the Daily Telegram who will discuss the print media.
  • April 18th will feature Kelly Heidbreder who will discuss video and television media and her experiences in the television business and currently as the LISDTV Station Manager.
  • April 25th will feature Chris Renwick, who was the news director on WLEN and is now a newscaster on WJR and will discuss his experiences at WJR.

Poetry Appreciation, Charmaine Stangl (Room 2) 
1 PM Tuesdays, April 4, 11, 18, 25

The class will begin with two great forerunners of modern poetry: Emily Dickinson and Gerard Manley Hopkins. Among other poets included will be e e Cummings, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, and Seamus Heaney.

All will be poets who sing in new ways, not like skylarks. Charmaine Stangl is a retired English teacher and life-long lover of poetry. She has taught in two high schools, a community college, two universities, and most recently, for Lenawee Lifelong Learning.

Shakespeare’s Richard the Third, Dr. Robert Ploegstra  (Room 2) 
3 PM Tuesdays, April 4, 11, 18, 25

An historical and literary discussion of Shakespeare’s Richard the Third….. Robert Ploegstra, PhD, born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University.

A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is an expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage.

Advanced Genealogy, Elusive Ancestors, Cathy Miller 
3 PM, Tuesdays, April 4, 11, 18, 25

Advanced Genealogy will take your research to the next level. Learn to fill in the blanks and make your ancestors more robust. We will review basic methods while working on proven measures to find those elusive ancestors. Learn how to formulate a research plan and analyze the data. Bring your research thus far and problems you have encountered and we will try to break through those brick walls. Please make sure to bring to our first class a pedigree with YOUR brick wall highlighted for me to work from. I will be happy to help give you suggestions on how to move forward.

Ms. Miller is a Genealogist and Family Historian. She has over 30 years in US, CA and UK with Alsace, French, German and Swedish record extractions.

Ways of Thinking and Feeling in Ancient China, Dr. Michael McGrath 
9 AM Wednesday, April 5, 12, 19, 26

The course will look at the origins of ideas about the dao (also spelled tao)(“the way”),qi/chi/ki (“life force”), and yin-yang that shaped Chinese philosophy, art, medicine, their concepts of beauty, happiness, how to deal with anger, and such. I will use images of Chinese art and small quotes from the founders of these ideas.

Dr. McGrath is well known to our students. He earned his Ph.D. from Princeton Un. He has experience as an Adrian College professor and former instructor for LLL on World Religions. His other experiences include military service and as an instructor of History.

Exploring the Chakras, Avani Pandya  (3 weeks only)  
11 AM Wednesdays, April 12, 19, 26

According to ancient Vedic literature, there are many “chakras”, energy centers, located throughout our energetic body field. There are seven main chakras which align the spine, starting from the base of the spine to the crown of the head. Each chakra is associated with different qualities of spiritual, physical and emotional health. We will explore these energy center in terms of their physical and neuronal associations, meditate on them and reap their benefits for a healthier lifestyle.

Avani Pandya has degrees in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology and certifications in various aspects of meditation through the Chopra Center. This rich combination allows her to teach with depth and passion the physical, spiritual, and emotional benefits of meditation.

The Language of Film, Fr. Roland Calvert
1 PM Wednesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26

Film has its own language. How do those who create films talk about their art? What are the roles of the scriptwriter, director, cinematographer, and the actors? We will watch short films and excerpts of longer films and discuss them, analyzing the decisions made by the filmmakers. The goal is for those in the class to be able to watch films more perceptively and be able to tell what makes a well-made film or a bad film.

Fr. Roland Calvert, a member of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales, who taught for 22 years and served as Chaplain for the Adrian Dominican Motherhouse for 22 years. He taught film study for many years at the high school, college and adult-ed levels. He worked for a master’s degree in film study for four summers at Notre Dame Un. and describes himself as a certified “film nut” who has loved films since youth.

Michigan bumble bees, their lives, communities and associates, including the 25 families of mites that associate with bumble bees. Dr. Robert Husband 
3 PM Wednesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26

At the point in April that queen bees emerge from aestivation, we will fly tethered (by the instructor) bees to learn firsthand about their flight activity. No, I have never been stung while tethering bumble bees and I intend to release them to the wild when we are done with them.

  • Class 1 will deal with how many of the approximately 400 species of bumblebees in the world are in Michigan and basic information about their biology such as nest size, foraging, longevity and where they exist and do not exist in the world. Preserved bumble bees will be examined to see if we can identify local species. We will look at conservation of local bumble bees. Yes, back yard gardens help.
  • Class 2 will discuss the collection of 6,000 Michigan bumble bees by my late wife, three kids and me (mostly in Kalamazoo County but elsewhere as well). My PhD thesis dealt with “Acari associated with Michigan Bumble bees.” I will comment on what was discovered during this research such as the many different organisms that exist in the more than 20 nests collected by my wife and me.
  • Class 3, if any bees are out by then, will include the flying exercise and questions about bee flight. I will ask for four possible reasons why bumble bees are not found in Cuba, Dominican Republic or Puerto Rico. They are carpenter bees. Research on energy levels in bumble bees by Bernd Heinrich will be introduced.
  • Class 4. We will conclude by looking at recent research and activities with bumble bees, including rearing bumble bees for pollination.

Dr. Husband has degrees from U. Mich., Western Mich. U. (secondary and college teaching certificates), Mich. State U. and post-doctoral study at Ohio State U. and U. of Georgia. Published more than140 peer-reviewed scientific papers and discovered and described more than 20 new genera and more than 160 new species of animals. Still active in research and publishing. Professor of Biology at Adrian College for 33 years.

 

OFF SITE CLASSES

Mystery Bus Trip in Lenawee County 
8:30 AM Thursday, April 27th
Timeline

This is a first time offering for LLL. This will be a one day bus trip to three mystery locations in Lenawee County. The group will board the Adrian Maples Blue Football Bus at 8:30 am at the LISD Tech Center. At 9 am the bus will arrive at the first location where there will be a guide to take the group on a tour at that location. At 11 am the group will arrive at another mystery location. Around noon a bag lunch will be provided. At 1 pm the group will arrive at another mystery location where there will be a self-guided tour. Approximately 2:30 pm the group will board the bus to return to the LISD Tech Center at approximately 2:45 pm.

Cost is $40 per person (must have LLL Membership). Minimum of 20 participants to have the trip with a maximum of 40 participants.

Wine Making Class, Dr. Paul Rupert
Syllabus 


Lenawee Lifelong Learning is happy to announce that a Wine Making Class will be offered at the Adrian Center for the Arts this Spring. The instructor is Dr. Paul Rupert who previously taught several wine making classes for LLL. This class is NOT part of LLL, registration and payment will be handled by the ACA. LLL is simply making our members aware of this class since there has been past interest in similar classes. This class will be different from the previous LLL Wine Making classes in that a smaller quantity of wine will be made as well as designing and printing of labels will be part of the class.

For registration and additional details, pricing and class content you need to go the ACA website: http://www.adriancenterforthearts.org/

The course syllabus can also be found by clicking here.

 

LLL Spring Classes 2016 Archives

TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME 

9 am Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26 
Marilyn Kremer 
An historical look at America’s pastime – the game, the players, the scandals, the politics. Marilyn Kremer is a veteran LLL instructor and a lifelong enthusiast of the game of baseball.
THE 2016 AMERICAN PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 
11 am Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26 
Dr. Robert Gordon 
This course will be a combination of brief presentations and extensive discussions. Topics to be included will be: a historical overview of how presidents have been nominated; the difference between caucuses and primaries; the Electoral College; campaign finance; polling methodologies and results; how states select delegates to conventions; the requirements of delegates at conventions; voter registration; get out the vote drives; voter identification; fraud, and reporting election results past and present. Dr. Gordon taught History at Western Michigan University for 10 years before serving Siena Heights University in a variety of administrative and teaching roles for 37 years.
MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM (Room 2) 
11 am Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26 
Al Misseldine 
This course will be an in-depth study of Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night‘s Dream. Al Misseldine is a retired English Literature professor from Adrian College whose special passion is Shakespeare.
CRISES IN BRITISH HISTORY 
1 pm Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26 
Dr. Robert Ploegstra 
Four major crises in British History – Anglo-Saxon invasions, the Plantagenets, 1066 and all that, the Spanish Armada. Robert Ploegstra, Ph. D., born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is an expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage.
HEALTHY FOOD AND DRINK PRODUCTION AND HOW TO SELECT THEM 
3 pm Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26 
Dr. Howard Pennington and others Production of milk, beef, fruits, vegetables and water will be explained. All lectures will be given by local producers. They tell how their products are safe and healthy. The final lecture will be how consumers can select healthy foods, G.M.O., all natural, and other subjects will be explained.
April 5 – Blaine Baker, Clayton dairy farmer Tim Stutzman, Morenci beef farmer
April 12 – Scott Robertello, Kapnick Orchards Deb Marks, Britton, vegetables
April 19 – Will Sadler, Adrian Utilities, water Amy Gilhouse MAEAP, Lake Erie algae
April 26 – Vickie Pfeifer, Len. Co. Coop Ext., Food selection Howard Pennington, GMO, all natural, etc.
POETRY APPRECIATION (Room 1) 
3 pm Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26 Ms. 
Charmaine Stangl 
A survey of outstanding poems from Romantic period through contemporary poetry. Discussion and reading. Charmaine Stangl is a retired English teacher and lover of poetic expression.
POTPOURRI 
9 am Wednesdays, April 6, 13, 20, 27 
April 6 – John Barrett, landscaping and gardening trends. A discussion of past, current and future customer buying trends and preferences. John has spent over 45 years in retailing lawn and garden products to Lenawee County residents.
April 13 – Linda Freeborn, Smart gardening. Her passion has always been gardening. She is a certified advanced Master Gardener. The class will explore where to get university researched answers for the home gardener. A wide range of topics such as soil, plant selection and lawn care will be covered.
April 20 & 27 – Stan Goff, Concepts of Permaculture. Stan is a local writer and works with the permaculture project at the Adrian Dominican Campus. This class will introduce participants to the concept of permaculture – an ethical design system for sustainable human environments. Participants will tour the Adrian Dominican Sisters Permaculture Project site.
INTRODUCTION TO MEDITATION: Immerse, Move and Meditate 
11 am Wednesdays, April 6, 13, 20, 27 
Avani Pandya 
Find ways to manage stress, reduce anxiety, improve relationships, create inner peace, enhance sleep patterns, lower blood pressure or connect to spirit. Participants will learn to use simple movements, deep breathing, awareness of the energy centers with guided meditation and relaxing music. Avani Pandya has degrees in Molecular Biology, Microbiology and Biotechnology, certifications in various aspects of meditation through the Chopra Center. She also has certifications in gentle yoga. This combination allows her to teach the physical as well as the spiritual and emotional benefits of meditation.
HUMOR AND PSYCHOLOGY 
1 pm Wednesdays, April 6, 13, 20, 27 
Hank Cetola 
This class will examine humor from a psychological perspective. The class will be reviewing some theories of humor, research on the cognitive aspects of humor and humor appreciation. The class will examine research applications of humor in stress management, physical and psychological health, and communication. Many examples of humor will be used for illustrative purposes and participants will have the opportunity to generate humor of their own. Hank Cetola, earned his Ph.D. from Wayne State University. He is retired from Adrian College after teaching in the Psychology Department for 32 years. He has written many publications and has presented at many conferences during his career.
EXPLORING LOST ARTS AND CRAFTS 
3 pm Wednesdays, April 6, 13, 20, 27 
State Line Gem & Mineral Society 
Experience how some of our early arts and crafts are developed. Demonstrations on how these are done are presented by members of the State Line Gem & Mineral Society as follows: April 6th: Stain glass art demonstrated by Richard Brzezicki April 13th: Wire Wrapping, a form of jewelry design, demonstrated by Linda Miller April 20th: Spinning and Weaving demonstrated by Doris Brzezicki April 27th: Learn about geodes and how to hunt for them presented by Glenda Gasner.
OFFSITE CLASS 
SIMPLY COOKING – SIMPLY EATING 
2 to 3:30 pm Wednesdays, April 6, 13, 20, 27 
Michael Jacobs 
The focus of this class is healthful food preparation. Emphasis will be placed on sodium reduction, fresh food preparations and developing a heightened awareness of ingredients in processed foods. Michael Jacobs is a home chef. He has an extensive background in food preparation. When it comes to food, Michael believes it should look wonderful and appetizing, taste amazing, and be nutritionally sound. His focus is primarily on making the food we eat better. Michael’s mantra is “Simply cook… Simply eat!” This class will take place at the Blue Flame Room (Citizens Gas) on N. Winter Street. There will be a $10 fee for materials payable with your registration. Please park across the street in the public parking lot. This class will take place at the Blue Flame Room (Citizens Gas) on N. Winter Street. There will be a $10 fee for materials payable with your registration. Please park across the street in the public parking lot.
 

LLL Fall Classes 2015 Archives

THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY

9 am Tuesdays on October 6, 13, 20, 27
Dr. Robert Gordon
This course will explore the constitutional structure and history of the American Presidency.  Topics to be covered will include why we have a presidential form of government, the Electoral College, how electing a president has changed over time, the balance of power between the three branches of the federal government, impeachment, duties, notable presidents biographies, etc. plus how historical view of presidents change.

Dr. Gordon taught History at Western Michigan University for 10 years before serving Siena Heights University in a variety of administrative and teaching roles for 37 years.

NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY
11 am Tuesdays on October 6, 13, 20, 27
Mr. Ray Lennard
History of Native American’s earliest origins to interaction in 1800’s thru current times in Great Lakes region with focus on Lenawee County.

Mr. Lennard is the curator of the W. G. Thompson Museum.  He also serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable.


WRITING FAMILY STORIES
1 pm Tuesdays on October 6, 13, 20, 27
Dr. Robert Ploegstra
Everyone has family stories.  This course will suggest strategies and methods to get you started writing these stories for the younger generations in your lives.

Dr. Ploegstra, is a retired professor from Adrian College, with extensive knowledge in family history, an expert in names and knowledgeable in Middle English and Anglo-Saxon.

BEGINNING GENEALOGY
3 pm Tuesdays on October 6, 13, 20, 27
Ms. Cathy Smith Miller
Here is an opportunity to learn about beginning genealogy and how to start to learn about family history.

Ms. Miller is a Genealogist and Family Historian. She has 30 years in US, CA and UK with Alsace, French, German and Swedish record extractions.

THE BIG PICTURE – FROM BIG BANG TO NOW
9 am Wednesdays on October 7, 14, 21, 28
Dr.  Michael McGrath
Once again Dr. McGrath has a subject which we know will hold all students in awe. An interesting topic certain to keep us all glued to our seats.

Dr. McGrath is well known to our students. He has experience as an Adrian College professor and former instructor for LLL on World Religions.  His other experiences include military service and as an instructor of History.

MAJOR RELIGIONS – AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
(HELD IN COMMON ROOM)
11 am Wednesdays on October 7, 14, 21, 28
Sister Fran Lombaer
An overview of the history of human’s search for God through the major religions of the world using short video clips.

Sr. Lombaer is an Adrian Dominican Sister and member of the LLL Board.  She also has a Masters in Religious Studies from the University of San Francisco.

KING LEAR
(HELD IN SMALLER CLASS ROOM)
11 am Wednesdays, October 7, 14, 21, 28
Al Misseldine
The Tragedy of King Lear, in which the aging King of Britain decides for various reasons to step down from the throne and divide his kingdom evenly among his 3 daughters. Much misunderstanding, intrigue, grief and disaster ensue.

Al Misseldine is a retired English Literature professor from Adrian College whose special passion is Shakespeare.

POTPOURRI
Law Enforcement (Two Classes)
1 pm Wednesdays on October 7, 14
Tom Ray
Tom will present among many topics, some things we all need to be concerned about and aware of, especially awareness itself.

Tom is a retired police officer and shift commander with the Adrian Police Department.  He presently is an instructor at Jackson Community College.

Precious Metals & Gems
(One Class)
1 pm Wednesday, October 21
Charlie Pick
Mr. Pick will talk about what precious metals are and describe noble and base metals along with ID methods. He will also cover refining of silver and gold plus how to ID Diamonds and stones.

Charles Pick is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, a Vietnam Veteran, and a retired commercial pilot.  In his retirement years he has developed a business dealing in precious metals and gems.

Better Business Bureau
1 pm Wednesdays, October 28
Mr. Richard T. Eppstein, President
In this class, Mr. Eppstein reviews the latest current schemes and explains the most common ways consumers are cheated.  He also discusses the steps that all of us can take to protect ourselves, including our identities.   Questions are welcomed.

Mr. Eppstein is a graduate of U of Toledo and the BBB Institute for Executive Development, Washington D.C.  In addition he is a Vietnam veteran where he earned the Army Commendation Medal, Vietnam Signal Medal and the Bronze Star.

AMERICAN LEGENDS, LORE & LIES
3 pm Wednesdays October 7, 14, 21, 28
MS. Marilyn Kremer
American legends, lore and lies looks at the real persons behind the legendary heroes of the west. We’ll investigate the “real” Wyatt Earp, Bill Hickock, Daniel Boone, Kit Carson, and others. We’ll look at what really happened at the OK Corral, as well as other historical events. The course includes a visit to Native American lore, and also some of the local legends right here in Michigan.

Marilyn Kremer is a veteran LLL instructor with a number of years of teaching, an MA degree, and an eclectic interest in all sorts of subjects. Past classes looked at the history of the English language and history of theater. Her current class “pulls back the curtain” on the legends we knew as kids.

OFFSITE CLASSES

Ceramics – Raku
2 pm to 4 pm Tuesdays on October 6, 13, 20, 27
Dennis Swartzlander
We will sample building and firing Raku pieces.  Raku is an old method of firing work very quickly. We will spend three weeks making and glazing, and fire the last day of class. The pieces we make are generally not suited for use with food.

Dennis Swartzlander is an Adjunct professor for beginning and intermediate/advanced wheel throwing at Siena Heights University and co-instructor for Adult Community classes held at Siena.  Dennis also participates in shows and art fairs throughout the mid-west.

This class will take place at Siena Heights University, at Studio Angelico in studio 4.  There will be a $20 fee for materials payable with your registration.  This class has a limit of 8 students.

WINE TASTING, APPRECIATION, COMPARISON, ETC.
 4 pm Wednesdays on October 7, 14, 21, 28
Bob Utter – Owner & Operator
The four classes will introduce you to many aspects of growing vineyards, history of wine, tasting, involves both red and white wines.

Bob Utter owns and operates the Flying Otter Vineyard and Winery located between Adrian and Tecumseh.  As grape grower (viticulturist) and wine maker (oenologist) Bob performs all tasks from planting the vine to enjoying the wine.  Bob received his formal education in winemaking from VESTA, The Viticulture and Ecology Science and Technology Alliance. There is a $20 course fee for this course.

Flying Otter Vineyard & Winery
3402 Chase Road 

(From Adrian) take Rt. 52 North, turn right (East) on E. Valley Rd.  Take E. Valley to Wilmoth and turn right (south) onto Wilmoth.   Travel south on Wilmoth to Chase Rd.(about a ½ mile)  Turn left (East) on Chase Rd.  Take Chase Rd. east and turn left near top of hill (at the sign) and follow to Vineyard.

LLL Spring Classes 2015 – Archive

POTPOURRI
9:00 a.m. (Tue.)
April 7 Beth Stewart, Acupuncture Elements
April 14 & 21, Basics of Nutrition of Humans & Animals, Dr. Howard Pennington, D.V.M.
April 28, Communications (writings, business, social, etc.) Dr. Donald Kleinsmith
Beth Stewart is a 5 Element Acupuncturist and Diplomat of Acupuncture. She has been practicing Chinese medicine for 12 years, Dr. Howard Pennington is a retired D.V.M. with over 50 years of experience and former Air Force pilot, Dr Kleinsmith is a Professor, English at Adrian College (45 years).
 
HISTORY OF LENAWEE COUNTY (IMMIGRATION)
11:00 a.m.(Tue.)
April 7, 14, 21, 28
Mr. Ray Lennard
Michigan has a rich and diverse cultural make up thanks to a very pro immigration policy since the formation of the State in 1837. Lenawee County shares that same diversity. This class will explore the major ethnic groups that came to Lenawee and focus on the two major groups: Germans and Hispanics. Along the way the class will discuss the ideas of American plurality and the desire for homogeneity.Mr. Lennard is the curator of the W. G. Thompson Museum. He also serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable.
SCOTTISH HISTORY
1:00 p.m. (Tue.)
April 7, 14, 21, 28
Dr. Diane Henningfeld
This course is Scottish History through literature. Scotland has long been a literary country. This eclectic romp through Scottish history and culture will explore not only battles and politics but also Scottish poets and writers from the Middle Ages through the present day.Dr. Diane Andrews Henningfeld is an Adrian College professor emerita of English. Of Scottish descent, she has studied at the University of Aberdeen and the University of Edinburgh, and travels frequently to Scotland.
CHAUCER
3:00 p.m. (Tue. & Wed.)
April 7, 8, 14, 15,21,22,28, 29 (regular fee)
Dr. Robert Ploegstra
This is a familiarization of the Chaucer pilgrims, plus certain tales including the Millers tale.Dr. Ploegstra, a retired professor from Adrian College, with extensive knowledge in middle English and Anglo-Saxon, is an expert in names and early European History.Note: This class will consist of 8 classes which will be held on both Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
CHAUCER (Continued from Tuesday class)
3:00 p.m. (Wed.)
April 7,8,14,15,21,22,28,29
Dr. Robert Ploegstra
This is a continuation of same class held on Tuesdays.
ISLAM IN THE PRESENT
9:00 a.m. (Wed.)
April 8, 15, 22, 29
Dr. Michael McGrath
1st wk. – Origins and early Islam: Muhammad’s time.
2nd wk. – Islam’s golden and mature age: Al Ghazali’s time, Ibn Taymiyyah’s time, and Rumi’s time.
3rd wk. – Islam encounters the West: the time of Al-Afghani, Muhammad Abuduh, and al-Banna4th wk. – contemporary Islam; the age of ordinary Islam, fundamentalist Islam, and radical Islam mixed together. Dr. McGrath is a well informed individual on religions of the world. His experiences include military service and as an instructor of History at college level since 1983.
SUSTAINABILITY
1:00 a.m. (Wed.)
April 8, 15, 22, 29
Lee Lewis Walsh
Sustainability is an umbrella term for concepts that seek to minimize the impact of humans on Earth’s resources and ecosystems. If you strive to “think globally, act locally” this is a good class for you.Lee Lewis Welch is an avid supporter of “sustainability” and has earned a BA in English. She is involved in her community to make it a greener place to live, work and play. Lee leads and participates in many organizations to foster “sustainability”.
HISTORY OF THEATER
1:00 p.m. (Wed.)
April 8, 15, 22, 29
Marilyn Kremer
From the ancient Greeks to the “absurd” explore how theater has entertained audiences through the ages, and discover stagecraft secrets and changes through the centuries. A backstage tour of the Croswell is being planned for the class’s last act.
Marilyn Kremer (BA, MA) taught English and speech at Adrian High School which included a unit on theater history in her Speech II course curriculum. But not all her theater background is academic. No stranger to the stage, she performed in college and in her younger years, during summers at the Croswell.
PROGRAMS FOR OLDER ADULTS  
3:00 p.m. (Wed.)
April 8, 22, 29
Tom MacNaughton
April 15 Amy Young Tom will present concepts and ideas for programs involving senior adults on April 8, 22, and 29. Amy will provide insights into Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Goggle plus and other social media in a class on April 15.
Tom recently retired after a 31 year career at the Lenawee Department on Aging. He is also an adjunct professor at Siena Heights University where he teaches ‘Introduction to Gerontology’.Amy Young achieved a degree in Applied Science. She has over 20 years of experience in administration and Computer focused positions.
OFFSITE CLASSES 
Natural Wellness
11:00 a.m. (Wed.)
April 8 Mary Ann Davis (Healing touch, therapeutic touch, Reiki)
Students will learn about human energy system, energetic interventions, and the impact these processes have on comfort, health and healing. Energy techniques will be demonstrated and students will have an opportunity to learn a basic technique.Mary Ann has been certified in healing touch, teaching Reiki since 1997 and is well studied. She is a member of American Holistic Nurses Association. Mary Ann is an RN and posses many other accreditations.
April 15 Amy Graham (The Art and Science of Reflexology) Reflexology is a unique modality in the natural health field which promotes better health and well being.It is a science based on the principle that there are reflex areas in the hands and feet that correspond to all the glands, organs, parts and systems of the body. Stimulating these areas properly by using the thumbs and fingers can help many health problems in a natural way, help maintain good health, and prevent health issues.Amy Graham is a retired teacher with a bachelor’s degree in music education and a master’s degree in educational arts. Currently she is studying traditional naturopathy and will earn her Doctor of Naturopathy degree late in 2015. She is a certified Natural Health Educator, Therapist and Practitioner at Edison Chiropractic in Tecumseh where she offers individualized wellness consultations, healing modalities, detoxification methods and Tuning Element Sales.
April 22 Loretta Pickford (Mindfulness/Expressive art) Experience an introduction to mindfulness practices, expressive arts techniques and discover how they work together to improve overall mental and emotional well being. Discussions will include RAIN approach to Mindfullness. Course will include an expressive arts experience.Loretta (LLPC, NCC) specializes in women’s counseling and expressive arts therapy. She has experiences with individual and group counseling, life coaching and personal development workshops.
April 29 Corinne Bonafino (EFT – Emotional Freedom Technique)EFT, tapping the median system, combines the physical benefits of acupuncture with the cognitive benefits of conventional therapy for a much faster, more complete treatment of emotional, performance and physical struggles. This can change your life! Corinne Bonafino is a Holistic, Health and Quantum Touch Practitioner, an expert on EFT, and a certified hypnotherapist. She is founder and formulator of Calendula Naturals and Bonafino’s Organic Spice Blends.
Ceramics – Introduction to Wheel Throwing 
3 –5 p.m. (Tue.)
April 7, 14, 21, 28 Dennis Swartzlander
Participants will learn the basics of making pottery on the potter’s wheel, and will have made a set of mugs or soup bowls by the end of classes. The glazed and fired work will be available for pick up one week after classes end.Dennis Swartzlander is an Adjunct professor for beginning and intermediate/advanced wheel throwing at Siena Heights University and co-instructor for Adult Community classes held at Siena. Dennis also participates in shows and art fairs throughout the mid-west.This class will take place at Siena Heights University, at Studio Angelico in studio 4. There will be a $20 fee for materials payable with your registration. This class has a limit of 8 students.

ARCHIVE
LLL Fall Classes 2014

Ancient Healing In the Modern World (Expanded) 
9:00 a.m. (Tue.) 
In our age of medical specialties and health insurance crises many are exploring alternative approaches to wellness.  Many of these ideas look back to the holistic ways of the ancients.  This class will continue to explore in more depth some of the basic concepts behind energy and vibrational healing.  We will focus on ways to stay in healthy balance and regain a sense of personal power and peace in our lives using techniques from Healing Touch, ancient Cherokee medicine, and reconnecting with nature. The class is designed for those who took the first level last spring.  Others are welcome based on a conversation with Dinah to discuss your familiarity with the subject. 517 260-4431 Instructor, Dinah Wakeford, BA, MA, retired from Tecumseh Public Schools where she taught HS literature and writing for 35 years. Thirteen years ago, on a trip to the Galapagos Islands, she met a Cherokee shaman who changed her world view.  She has been studying Cherokee medicine and shamanism with him ever since and has a passion for sharing these approaches to wellness.   The
Animals Among Us 
11:00 a.m. (Tue.) 
This course will discuss the role of veterinarians, canines and felines-domestic and wild, uses, problems, diseases and parasites affecting them.  Horses and other farm animals, CFO’s and food production problems, as well as Zoonoses (infections common to man and animals) will be explained. Instructor: Howard Pennington, D.V.M., received both his Bachelors and D.V.M. from Michigan State University.  Howard has 50 years experience practicing veterinary medicine in Lenawee County.  Howard served in the U.S. Air Force as a jet pilot instructor.
The Language of Film 
1:00 p.m. (Tue.) 
Film has its own language. How do those who create films talk about their art? What are the roles of the scriptwriter, director, cinematographer, and the actors? We will watch short films and excerpts of longer films and discuss them, analyzing the decisions made by the filmmakers. The goal is for those in the class to be able to watch films more perceptively and be able to tell what makes a well made film or a bad film. Instructor, Fr. Roland Calvert, a member of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales, who taught for 22 years and served as Chaplain for the Adrian Dominican Motherhouse for 22 years. He taught film study for many years at the high school, college and adult ed levels. He worked for a master’s degree in film study for four summers at Notre Dame U. and describes himself as a certified “film nut” who has loved films since youth.
 
Family Origins & Tribal Migrations 
3:00 p.m. (Tue.)  
This class will trace people’s origins by looking at tribal migrations in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa, as well as using the history and origin of family names. Instructor: Bob Ploegstra, PhD, born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage.
Dealing with the Aging Process 
9:00 a.m. (Wed.)  
This course will explain how Hospice is able to play an important role in the aging process, how it is able to assist the patient and their families.  Representatives from Hospice of Lenawee will be at the first and last sessions.  The middle two sessions will provide information about estate planning, wills and trusts. Instructors:  Bill Kenyon, J.D. and Christopher Phillips, J.D.  Bill Kenyon is the Executive Director of Hospice of Lenawee.  He led a campaign to raise over $5 Million and the building of the new Hospice complex on Wolf Creek Hwy.  Christopher Phillips earned his J.D. at Valparaiso University and is a Vice President at First Federal Bank.  Christopher works in the Trust Dept. of the bank and develops and maintains client relationships in the Wealth Mgt. Division for Michigan and northwest Ohio locations.
Now Why Did I Say That? 
11:00 a.m. (Wed.)
An exploration of how our language developed, including a brief history of the English language; the effect of literature, trade and warfare on language development and content; how and why our language has changed over the centuries and how language mirrors history, society and culture.  We will also explore the origins of some of our common idiomatic expressions, and examine how modern technology is changing our language.  We’ll end the course with playing with puns and how they have influenced how we speak. Instructor:  Marilyn Kremer – has a BA in English from Adrian College and an MA in Organizational Leadership from Siena Heights University.  After teaching English for 5 years at Adrian High School, she spent the next 24 years in Human Resources Management, and for most of those years continued to teach part-time in the adult education program.  Though currently retired, she is an adjunct instructor at both Adrian College and SHU when they need her.  Among her many interests, she enjoys reading histories, biographies and mystery novels, and is an avid cruciverbalist!
The Lucky Language of Poetry 
1:00 p.m. (Wed.) 
Poetry is the most varied and rewarding game played with words.  In these classes, we will examine some of the elements of poetry and play with them ourselves.  We’ll read a variety of poems, both traditional and modern, and explore what gives them their power.  And we’ll create some short poems, such as the haiku and cinquain, as well as write longer works in both rimed and free verse.  Instructor, Patricia L. Schnapp, Ph.D., is a Sister of Mercy and current Associate Professor of English at Siena Heights University in Adrian, Michigan.  She also teaches a class each semester at the nearby state prison, Gus Harrison.  A poet, Pat has published her work in many religious journals and magazines.  In 2000, she was awarded First Place for Best Poetry by the Catholic Press Association.  In addition, she has published articles on poets Francis Thompson and Daniel Berrigan and novelist Alice McDermott.  With colleague Dan McVeigh, she also co-edited a book of short stories.  She recently published her second book of poems, Out of the Shadows.
Handmade Greeting Cards 
1:00 p.m. (Wed.) 
Have fun, save money and impress your friends!  Create your own greeting cards using a variety of methods.  No experience necessary.  Instead of spending time picking out a few cards, come join us in learning basic card designs that you can use over and over.  Your friends will be impressed and delighted to receive your beautiful, hand-made cards.    Either experience with stamping or participation in the first card making class is required.  Materials fee:  $20.00.   Instructor, Joy Finfera, OP is a Dominican Sister of Adrian, who has practiced card making and scrapbooking for more than 15 years.  She has taught a variety of classes around the country and continues to search out workshops to learn new card-making processes and ideas.
Art3 
3:00 p.m. (Tue.) 
This class provides an opportunity to experience the art of paper folding, ink and wash techniques, and drawing realistic portraits. Absolutely no experience is required! Week one learn how to create Iris folds; week two learn how to use ink and water color washes to create beautiful fruit renderings; and weeks three and four learn how to begin drawing realistic portraits What you need: 1-square 5×5” frame (Hobby Lobby photo frame #177360 or a square mat – Hobby Lobby will cut paper mats to fit a 10×10” frame @ $6); cardboard backing board of the same size; 4 types of decorative ribbon (any design but must be a tight weave; no open mesh; 1 ½” width; look for complementary colors/design); National Geographic magazines (if available but no other types please); scotch tape (1” width); kneaded eraser; Faber Castel 9000 Pencil Art Set; 1-Dr. Ph. Martin waterproof India ink (black); 1-speedball calligraphy pen #102 Crow Quill and 1-additional nib (#102 & #107 set); 1- 15” ruler; and, 1-Windsor & Newton Cotman Water Colours Sketchers Pocket Box (OK to bring your own watercolors). All supplies available at Hobby Lobby. Plan ahead: use the weekly news coupon or your smart phone and save 40% on one item per purchase. For the drawing class – please bring a high quality B&W copy of a headshot of you/your favorite person (no animals please); you will draw on this copy. Instructor:  Pat Bogusz, is a local Tecumseh artist and received her Bachelor’s of Religious education from William Tyndale College (not that that has anything to do with her current artistic endeavors). Some of her artistic endeavors and accomplishments include: serving as Secretary of the Lenawee Council on Visual Arts, exhibiting at the Croswell Art Gallery and at the 2011 & 2013 ArtPrize competition, and teaching at the 2014 LISD Fine Arts Festival. Pat currently has various works on display at Sass, including Iris Folds, for those interested in viewing her art.  The following classes are NOT at the Weber Center.
Tea Time on Tuesday 
3:00 p.m. (Tue.) 
Enjoy a tea-rrific time at Governor Croswell Team Room on Tuesdays in October learning all about tea. The first session includes: the origin and history of tea, fun and interesting tea facts and tea trivia.  Taste different teas during the second session and learn “proper tea brewing”.  Experience a traditional English High Tea during the last session.  (Material Fee – $25) (This course will take place at the Governor Croswell Tea Room, 125 East Maumee St.) Instructor:  Phyllis Wilkerson, is a retired home economics teacher who is co-owner with her husband, Al, of the Governor Croswell Tearoom in Adrian and the Sweet Afton Tearoom in Plymouth, MI.  Both of their tearooms have recently been recognized in the prestigious publication, Tea Time Magazine, a Best Publication Award winner at the 2014 World Tea Expo.
Wine Making & Appreciation 
6:30 p.m. (Tue.)  
This course is a special topics course dealing with the production and appreciation of wine.  Each session will consist of a brief lecture, demonstration or tutorial followed by a workshop in which participants, working in pairs, will produce a 23 liter (30 bottle) batch of a wine of their choice.  (Materials fees-$50 per participant and each participant will take home 15 bottles of wine.) Instructor:  Paul Rupert, PhD, received his B.S. in Chemistry from Carnegie Mellon Un., his PhD. from the Un. of Pittsburgh and an MBA from the Un. of Virginia.  He is currently Chair of the Chemistry Dept. of Adrian College.  He is the owner of Vinosity, LLC and Cool Climate Analytical, a commercial chemical and microbiological analytical laboratory specializing in the wine and grape industry.  He has won Gold, Silver and Bronze medals for wines he has produced at the Wine Maker International Amateur Wine Competition, the largest competition in the world for non-professional winemakers. (This class will meet at Adrian College on Tuesdays (and one Thursday) and will be approximately 2 hours each session.)  Please see separate class syllabus for additional details.  Grape selection needs to be made two weeks prior to the first class.  Please contact Greg DuMars, 517-263-3293, with grape selection. Click here for the syllabus

LLL Spring Classes 2014: Archive Below

Buddhism
9am Wed.
The course will cover four periods: (1) The origins of Buddhism and the story of the Buddha, (2) Buddhism becomes two, the origins of Mahayana Buddhism, (3) Buddhism becomes three, the origins of Tibetan Buddhism, (4) Buddhism in the China, Korea, Japan and the West. Instructor: Michael McGrath earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He served in the Army from 1962-1969, with his last assignment as a team leader of a special operations team in Vietnam. He has taught in the History Department at Adrian College since 1983.
 
Ancient Healing In the Modern World
9 am Thurs.
In our age of medical specialties and health insurance crises many are exploring alternative approaches to wellness.  Some of these ideas are new and many look back to the holistic ways of the ancients.  This class will explore some of the basic concepts behind energy and vibrational healing.  We will discuss chakras, energy centers in the body, how to keep them in balance and free of blocks, as well as ways to regain a sense of power and peace over your own life using techniques from Healing Touch and ancient Cherokee medicine. Instructor, Dinah Wakeford, BA, MA, retired from Tecumseh Public Schools (35 ½ years) as a HS literature and writing teacher.  Twelve years ago, on a trip to the Galapagos Islands, she met a Cherokee shaman who changed her world view.  She has been studying Cherokee medicine and shamanism with him ever since and has a passion for sharing these new approached to wellness.
Psychology of Humor 
11 am Wed.
This class will examine humor from a psychological perspective.  The class will be reviewing some theories of humor, research on the cognitive aspects of humor and humor appreciate.  The class will examine research applications of humor in stress management, physical and psychological health, and communication.  Many examples of humor will be used for illustrative purposes and participants will have the opportunity to generate humor of their own. Instructor: Hank Cetola, earned his Ph.D. from Wayne State University.  He is retired from Adrian College after teaching in the Psychology Department for 32 years.  He has written many publications and has presented at many conferences during his career.
Lenawee Country’s Role in the Underground Railroad 
11 am Thurs.
The abolitionist movement and the underground railroad have long held a unique place in the history and heritage of Lenawee County.  In this class we will examine the growth of the abolitionist movement in the “West” starting with the settlement of Lenawee County in the 1820’s, the rise of powerful UGRR figures such as Laura Haviland, the explosive politics of the 1850’s which lead to the Civil War, and the aftermath of the successful movement with the passage of the 13th and 14th amendments. Instructor: Ray Lennard, is curator of the W G Thompson House Museum in Hudson, Michigan. He serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable and has been a Civil War re-enactor for more than 25 years.
Personal Experiences from World War II 
1 pm Wed.
Four different survivors from WW II will share their experiences from the Battle of Leyte Gulf, the Battle of the Bulge and their personal experiences fighting in the war as well as growing us as a youth during the war. Lecturers:  Bob Freligh, Frank Dick, Andy Engardio and Gunther Lengnick.
Handmade Greeting Cards (Advanced Level) 
1 pm Thurs.
Have fun, save money and impress your friends!  Create your own greeting cards using a variety of methods.  No experience necessary.  Instead of spending time picking out a few cards, come join us in learning basic card designs that you can use over and over.  Your friends will be impressed and delighted to receive your beautiful, hand-made cards.    Either experience with stamping or participation in the first card making class is required.  Materials fee:  $20.00.   Instructor, Joy Finfera, OP is a Dominican Sister of Adrian, who has practiced card making and scrapbooking for more than 15 years.  She has taught a variety of classes around the country and continues to search out workshops to learn new card-making processes and ideas.
Jesus Before Christ: The Quest for the Man Behind the Myth 
3 pm Wed.
The earliest narrative account of Jesus’ life appeared nearly four decades after his death and was not written by an eyewitness. What sort of person was he really, and what happened during the years in between his life and his story? This class will explore what historians and biblical scholars have learned about the Jewish man from Galilee and the message he spread in the shadow of the Roman Empire. The picture that takes shape can be rather surprising, and often contrasts sharply to the familiar portrait one finds in the New Testament gospels. Instructor:  Scott Elliott, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at Adrian College, where he teaches courses in Hebrew Bible, New Testament, religion in film, and ancient Greek and Roman fiction. He is the author of Reconfiguring Mark’s Jesus (Sheffield Phoenix, 2011) and co-editor of Ideology, Culture, and Translation (Society of Biblical Literature, (2012).
The Odyssey and the Trojan War 
3 pm Thurs.
This course will look at the Greek World and its epics the Odyssey and the Iliad.  A background and discussion course. Instructor: Bob Ploegstra, PhD, born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage.
The Center for Sustainable Future Explained 
3 pm Thurs.
Week #1 – Net Zero campus – what does that mean?  The SEED House (overview of what Mid-West Energy intends to build on the Campus 2014-2015). Leslie Coates (LISD) and Patty Clark (Mid-West Energy).   Week #2 – Wind/Solar Energy – power basics; on-site generation vs. wind farms; environmental benefits & concerns. David Munson & Associates, Inc.   Week #3 – Crop DNA: genetically modified crops. Food sample to test for the presence of genetic elements associated with GMOs. Matthew Badtke, JC Professor in Science and HPF Dept.Week #4 – Sustainable Agriculture & Ornamental Horticulture – Casey Muck, LISD TECH Center Teacher Assistant in Agri-Tech; (Classes at LISD Center for a Sustainable Future, 4260 Tipton Hwy.; April 3,10,17,& 24; 3-4:30 PM).
Wine Making & Appreciation
6:30 m Tues.
This course is a special topics course dealing with the production and appreciation of wine.  Each session will consist of a brief lecture, demonstration or tutorial followed by a workshop in which participants, working in pairs, will produce a 23 liter (30 bottle) batch of a wine of their choice.  (Materials fees-$50 per participant and each participant will take home 15 bottles of wine.) Instructor:  Paul Rupert, PhD, received his B.S. in Chemistry from Carnegie Mellon Un., his PhD. from the Un. of Pittsburgh and an MBA from the Un. of Virginia.  He is currently Chair of the Chemistry Dept. of Adrian College.  He is the owner of Vinosity, LLC and Cool Climate Analytical, a commercial chemical and microbiological analytical laboratory specializing in the wine and grape industry.  He has won Gold, Silver and Bronze medals for wines he has produced at the Wine Maker International Amateur Wine Competition, the largest competition in the world for non-professional winemakers. (This class will meet at Adrian College on Tuesdays (and one Thursday) and will be approximately 2 hours each session.)  Please see separate class syllabus for additional details.

LLL Fall Classes Archive 2013: Below

Middle East Politics
(9 am Wed.)
This class will review and discuss current events taking place in the Middle East while looking at the role that history has played in setting up the present conflicts.
Instructor: John Weeks PhD,  is a retired long time history professor from Adrian College.  John earned his PhD from the Ohio State University.  John has made many presentations on current events in the Middle East.
Adrian Dominican Sisters: From Regensburg to Adrian and Beyond – A Journey in Faith
(9 am Thurs.)
The Adrian Dominican Sisters trace their origin to Regensburg, German, in the mid 1800s. Responding to the needs of the immigrant Catholic Church in the United States, they found a home in Adrian, Michigan. From there they became a major force in the development of Catholic education at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels in the country. Their sense of Mission led them into healthcare and social work as well. Their work has taken them overseas and to new ventures in the contemporary period.
Instructor: Nadine Foley, OP, earned her MA and PhD from The Catholic University of America. She has taught at Siena Heights Un., Barry Un., Drake Un., Marist College and Harvard Divinity School.  She was the Interim Pres. of Siena Heights College in 1994 for 7 months. Currently she is the historian in the Department of History of the Adrian Dominican Sisters. She has also published numerous articles dealing with all aspects of faith.
Successful Aging
(11 am Wed.)
“Successful Aging” will explore what successful aging is and examine the lives of those who have made a major impact on society in later life. Each student will determine what they can do to improve their chance at aging successfully. Every student will change behaviors as a result of taking this class.
Instructor: Tom MacNaughton, earned his BA degree from Defiance College.  Tom recently retired after a 31 year career at the Lenawee Department on Aging.  He is also an adjunct professor at Siena Heights University where he teaches ‘Introduction to Gerontology’.
History of Industry in Lenawee 
(11 am Thurs.)
Lenawee has long been an economic engine in the state of Michigan and in the United States. From the time of Michigan’s settlement, the region always has had a role in agriculture. As the 19th century gave way to the 20th, industry grew across the cities of Adrian, Hudson, and Tecumseh.  This class will look at Lenawee’s ag business, the growth, bust and rebirth of industry in the area and how transportation and the need for workers played a role in Lenawee’s past and how it is shaping the future.
Instructor: Ray Lennard, is curator of the W G Thompson House Museum in Hudson, Michigan. He serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable and has been a Civil War re-enactor for more than 25 years.
Fine Arts 
(1 pm Wed.)
This is a series of four classes that will be presented by the below instructors.  Each will discuss topics related to their expertise in their areas so participants can gain more appreciation of the arts.
Instructors: Michael Lackey, John Dodson, Peter Barr and Tom Thiery.
Handmade Greeting Cards
(1 pm Thurs.)
Have fun, save money and impress your friends!  Create your own greeting cards using a variety of methods.  No experience necessary.  Instead of spending time picking out a few cards, come join us in learning basic card designs that you can use over and over.  Your friends will be impressed and delighted to receive your beautiful, hand-made cards.  Materials fee:  $20.00.
Instructor: Joy Finfera, OP is a Dominican Sister of Adrian, who has practiced card making and scrapbooking for more than 15 years.  She has taught a variety of classes around the country and continues to search out workshops to learn new card-making processes and ideas.
A Reading of Hamlet
(3 pm Wed.)
The class will read and study Shakespeare’s Hamlet.
Instructor: Al Misseldine, taught literature at Adrian College for about 35 years after teaching for three years and studying for six years at Marquette University in Milwaukee.
Family Origins & Tribal Migrations
(3 pm Thurs.)
This class will trace people’s origins by looking at tribal migrations in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa, as well as using the history and origin of family names.
Instructor: Bob Ploegstra, PhD, born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage
Wine Making & Appreciation
(6:30 pm Tues.)
This course is a special topics course dealing with the production and appreciation of wine.  Each session will consist of a brief lecture, demonstration or tutorial followed by a workshop in which participants, working in pairs, will produce a 23 liter (30 bottle) batch of a wine of their choice.  (Materials fees-$50 per participant and each participant will take home 15 bottles of wine.)
Instructor:  Paul Rupert, PhD, received his B.S. in Chemistry from Carnegie Mellon Un., his PhD. from the Un. of Pittsburgh and an MBA from the Un. of Virginia.  He is currently Chair of the Chemistry Dept. of Adrian College.  He is the owner of Vinosity, LLC and Cool Climate Analytical, a commercial chemical and microbiological analytical laboratory specializing in the wine and grape industry.  He has won Gold, Silver and Bronze medals for wines he has produced at the Wine Maker International Amateur Wine Competition, the largest competition in the world for non-professional winemakers. (This class will meet at Adrian College on Tuesdays (and one Thursday) and will be approximately 2 hours each session.)  Please see separate course description for additional details.

ARCHIVE: Spring classes will be held on Thursdays, March 14, 21, 28 and April 4, 2013. 

9:00 a.m.
Buddhism
The course will cover four periods: (1) The origins of Buddhism and the story of the Buddha, (2) Buddhism becomes two, the origins of Mahayana Buddhism, (3) Buddhism becomes three, the origins of Tibetan Buddhism, (4) Buddhism in the China, Korea, Japan and the West.

Instructor: Michael McGrath earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He served in the Army from 1962-1969, with his last assignment as a team leader of a special operations team in Vietnam. He has taught in the History Department at Adrian College since 1983.

9:00 a.m.
Adrian Dominican Sisters: From Regensburg to Adrian and Beyond – A Journey in Faith
The Adrian Dominican Sisters trace their origin to Regensburg, German, in the mid 1800s. Responding to the needs of the immigrant Catholic Church in the United States, they found a home in Adrian, Michigan. From there they became a major force in the development of Catholic education at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels in the country. Their sense of Mission led them into healthcare and social work as well. Their work has taken them overseas and to new ventures in the contemporary period.

Instructor: Nadine Foley, OP, earned her MA and PhD from The Catholic University of America. She has taught at Siena Heights Un., Barry Un., Drake Un., Marist College and Harvard Divinity School.  She was the Interim Pres. of Siena Heights College in 1994 for 7 months. Currently she is the historian in the Department of History of the Adrian Dominican Sisters. She has also published numerous articles dealing with all aspects of faith.

11:00 a.m.
The Civil War and Lenawee County
Lenawee County citizens participated in great numbers during the Civil War. Now learn more about the American conflict during the 150th anniversary. Participants will learn about the causes, issues, and outcomes from the war through the stories and histories of Lenawee residents, including members of the 4th Michigan, the 18th Michigan, Asa Mahan, Laura Haviland, and others!

Instructor: Ray Lennard, is curator of the W G Thompson House Museum in Hudson, Michigan. He serves as President of the Lenawee County Civil War Roundtable and has been a Civil War re-enactor for more than 25 years.

1:00 p.m.
The Language of Film
Film has its own language. How do those who create films talk about their art? What are the roles of the scriptwriter, director, cinematographer, and the actors? We will watch short films and excerpts of longer films and discuss them, analyzing the decisions made by the filmmakers. The goal is for those in the class to be able to watch films more perceptively and be able to tell what makes a well made film or a bad film.

Instructor : Fr. Roland Calvert, a member of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales, who taught for 22 years and served as Chaplain for the Adrian Dominican Motherhouse for 22 years. He taught film study for many years at the high school, college and adult ed levels. He worked for a master’s degree in film study for four summers at Notre Dame U. and describes himself as a certified “film nut” who has loved films since youth.

1:00 p.m.
Family Origins
Tracing people’s origins by looking at tribal migrations in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa. Also using the history and origin of family names.

Instructor: Bob Ploegestra, Ph.D. , born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, attended Calvin College, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. A linguist and student of Anglo-Saxon, he is expert in names, early European history, and proud of his Frisian heritage

3:00 p.m.
Reading and Writing Contemporary Poetry
Poetry offers a creative and moving way of viewing the world, ourselves, and others. In this class, participants will have the opportunity of delving deeply into an eclectic collection of contemporary poetry.  We will examine traditional and innovative forms and try our hand at writing a few poems to share with the group. Lively discussion and meaningful reflection will be the hallmarks of this class.

Instructor: Diane Henning feld, Ph.D., is an emerita professor of English at Adrian College who has been teaching fiction and poetry since 1988. She recently participated in the Kenyon Review’s Writers Workshop and has published poems in The Michigan Poet, Penwood Review, and Storm Cellar.

ARCHIVE: FALL 2012 CLASSES

Fine Arts Series
This is a series of four different classes emphasizing four different areas of the Arts.  The first class will be about music, taught by John Dodson, ASO Director.  Mark DiPietro, the chair of the Siena Heights Un. Theater Dept., will be the instructor of the second series.  Mark will be discussing various aspects of the theater. The third session will be about one and two dimensional art and will be taught by Pi Benio, an Art Professor at Adrian College.  The final session will be about digital culture and will be taught by Davin Heckman, a Fulbright Scholar, who is a professor at Siena Heights University.

Instructors: John Dodson, Mark DiPietro, Pi Benio, & Davin Heckman

Permaculture: Learning from Nature – to Survive and Thrive
Permaculture is a sustainable design system that honors biodiversity, copies ideas from nature (biomimicry) and utilizes successful food growing practices of indigenous peoples and small farmers around the world.  The word “permaculture” may be new, but many parts of this design system will be recognized from practices in our own families.  It is a local and bioregional response to global problems facing us today: climate change, fossil energy dependence, massive losses of topsoil, aquifers, fisheries and species.

Instructors: Carol Coston, OP, an Adrian Dominican sister, has practiced organic gardening and Permaculture for over 30 years.  In 2011 she moved to Adrian after living and working for 19 years at Sisterfarm in Central Texas.  Her book, Permaculture: Finding Our Own Vines and Fig Trees describes the Permaculture practices established on Sisterfarms seven acres.  It will be given to each class participant.  (See http://www.sisterfarm.org for videos and an interactive map.)

Stan Goff is a writer and gardener who studies permaculture and lives in Adrian with his wife Sherry. He is a member of St. Mary’s of Good Counsel Catholic Church.  Stan has written books about militarism, gender, energy politics, and the 1994 invasion of Haiti.

Women and Men of Faith: Embracing Our Own Wisdom
God comes to us in common, ordinary events of life. We only need eyes and ears to recognize the ordinary as a time of extraordinary blessing.  Looking at the lives of people of faith who preceded us leads us to embrace our own wisdom.

Instructor: Sr. Jeanette Jabour, OP holds a Master of Arts in Religion, Athenaeum of Ohio; Diploma in Spiritual Theology, Toronto School of Theology; Co-Director of annual Institute on Aging and Spirituality, Greater Cincinnati Area, 1985-1993.


Islam and How it Got Here (2012).  

Most of us have heard of the Islamic extremists (1%), but have not heard much from or about ordinary Muslims (99%).  We will explore the Islamic and Western roots of what Muslims believe and do in our own times.

Instructor: Michael McGrath earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University.  He served in the Army from 1962-1969, with his last assignment as a team leader of a special operations team in Vietnam.  He has taught in the History Department at Adrian College since 1983.


Facebook for Seniors
This course is designed with Lenawee County senior learners who would like to use Facebook to connect with friends and family members.  Participants will learn how to:  Create their own Facebook (FB) page, Set security parameters for their FB page, Post and respond to comments, Post digital photographs to their page.

Instructor: Dr. Robert Gordon, a native of Holland, Michigan and a history graduate of Hope College has worked at Siena Heights in a variety of positions since 1977.  Currently, Bob is the library director.  At 71 he is an active senior learning who reads 2-3 books a week, travels, golfs, is deeply involved in photography, and is a member of the Adrian Morning Rotary Club.  He is a daily user of Facebook to stay in touch with friends and professional colleagues.